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Easy Lesson Plan on Tattling vs Telling for Grades 1st to 3rd.

Tattling vs Telling Lesson Plan 123

Introduction

Bullying negatively affects the atmosphere of a school and disrupts the learning environment. However,if a student reports every negative interaction to the teacher and becomes a tattle-tale, leaning on the teacher to handle all potential conflicts, this can also become an issue that hinders learning. The first steps in preventing these problems is to educate students on when it is appropriate to talk to an adult about a situation. It takes the entire school community to create an inviting environment where everyone feels they belong and are safe. Working together,administrators, teachers, school staff, parents, and students can help provide harmony in your school.

Teacher Preparation

For this lesson, the teacher needs to be prepared to act out scenarios in which he/she plays the student tattling or telling and a student acts as the teacher.

Resources and Materials

  • Paper
  • Pencil

Lesson Overview

Students will be able to:

  1. Define tattling and telling.
  2. Analyze situations to identify tattling or telling.
  3. Practice “I statements”.
  4. Develop an appropriate list of people who should be “told” when bullying is happening.

Explanation (10 Minutes):

Ask the students what they think “tattling” means and ask for some examples.

  • Explain that tattling refers to letting someone else know about another person’s behavior when it is not dangerous or destructive. When someone tattles, often the goal is to get someone else in trouble for his or her behavior. Ask the students for some examples of tattling.

Ask students what they think “telling” means and ask for some examples.

  • Explain that telling is used when someone observes a dangerous or destructive behavior. For example: “Some kids at recess left the play area and were talking to strangers.” “Someone is bullying me at school and online and I don’t feel safe.” or “Someone ripped a seat on the school bus.”

Have the students repeat the following to help them understand the difference between tattling and telling:

  • Tattling is to get someone else in trouble.
  • Telling is to keep someone or something safe.

Tattling Worksheet

Action (15 Minutes):

Decide if this is a tattle or telling…

Michelle fell down on the playground. -telling

  • Is there a possibility someone got hurt in this situation?
  • Who might be hurt?
  • Should you tell the teacher?

Randy has a knife. -telling

  • Is there a possibility someone got hurt in this situation?
  • Who might be hurt?
  • Should you tell the teacher?

Noah dropped his pencil. -tattling

  • Is there a possibility someone got hurt in this situation?
  • Who might be hurt?
  • Should you tell the teacher?

Joey ran out into the street. -tattling

  • Is there a possibility someone got hurt in this situation?
  • Who might be hurt?
  • Should you tell the teacher?

Ask for student volunteers. In each of the following scenarios, a student will play the teacher determining whether each is a tattle or a tell. You will play the student. Feel free to have fun playing the student who is tattling.

You: Ashley’s throwing leaves.

  • Student playing the teacher: Asks class to determine whether you are tattling or telling.

You: Tyler cut in line at lunch.

  • Student playing the teacher: Asks class to determine whether you are tattling or telling.

You: Charlie is talking about beating Mike up after school.

  • Student playing the teacher: Asks class to determine whether you are tattling or telling.

You: Glen is throwing rocks.

  • Student playing the teacher: Asks class to determine whether you are tattling or telling.

Thank the student for volunteering to be the teacher and ask him/her to sit back down.

Application (15 minutes):

Ask the students what they think they should do if someone hurts their feelings. Should they tell the teacher or would that be tattling? Is there another option? Give the students the following scenario and ask what they might do in that situation.

“Danny won’t play with me.“

  • Is there a possibility someone got hurt in this situation?
  • Who might be hurt?
  • If your feelings were hurt, could you tell Danny how you felt?

Example

    • “It hurts my feelings when you won’t play with me because I really like you and want to be your friend.”
  • If you were Danny in this situation, how could you respond?

Example

    • Danny: “What can I do to help you feel better?”

Tattling 456 Wprksheet BO075x 100


If another student talks to you while the teacher is talking and you want to hear the teacher, is that a situation in which someone would get hurt or hurt others?

  • Is there a possibility someone got hurt in this situation?

(At this point, introduce an “I feel” statement.)

  • “I feel ________ when you _______________ because ____________________________. Teach the

Teach the offending student to respond, “What can I do to help you feel better?”


“Julie took my ball at recess.“(Also available on separate activity sheets)

  • Who might be hurt?
  • What can you say to Julie?
  • If you were Julie, how could you respond?“

    Example

      • Student: “Julie, I felt ___(angry)____ when ___(you took my ball at recess)___ because ___(I was looking forward to playing with it)_____.”
      • Julie: “I’m sorry I took your ball. What can I do to help you feel better?”

    “I heard Sophie talking about my best friend and saying mean things.“

    • Is there a possibility someone got hurt in this situation?
    • What can you say to Sophie?
    • If you were Sophie, how could you respond?

    “Zak said I was too short to be on the team.“

    • Is there a possibility someone got hurt in this situation?
    • What can you say to Zak?
    • If you were Zake, how could you respond?

    Teacher Note

    Help your kids put words to their emotions. Naming feelings can be trickier than we sometimes realize. Helping our kids find the right words that express what they’re feeling is a great way for them to come to understand the feelings of others.

    Some things you can say to a student to help them with “I statements” when their feelings have been hurt:

    • “What can you say to your friend?”
    • “Did you tell your friend how you felt?”

    Some teachers put posters up in their rooms that detail “I-Statements” and some have pictures of possible scenarios in which to use “I Statements” and when to “tell” the teacher.

    Review (5 Minutes):

    • If another student does something you don’t like, who can you tell?
    • Tell the other student how that action made you feel.
    • If you did something that another student didn’t like, what can you say?
    • What can I do to help you feel better?

    Assessment (5 Minutes):

    Ask students to draw two pictures. In the first picture, someone is about to get hurt and the student needs to tell the teacher about it. In the second picture, another student does something that you don’t like and you tell the student how it makes you feel.

    Get this lesson plan, three worksheets and answer key.

    Lesson Plan on Tattling

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    Easy Lesson Plan on Using the Internet Safely and Responsibly for Grades 4th to 6th

    Lesson Plan on Internet Safety

    Introduction

    The Internet is a great place for finding information and general entertainment, but it can also be a dangerous place. Left unattended, kids can wander onto inappropriate websites, talk to strangers or end up in other compromising situations. However, teachers can help their students learn some of the dangers involved with using the Internet and develop strategies for staying safe online.

    Objectives

    • Students will identify risks that come with using the Internet.
    • Students will explain ways to safely use the Internet.
    • Students will demonstrate an understanding of the importance of using the Internet safely

    Teacher Preparation

    Teacher will listen to the Internet safety audio clip and become familiar with the scenarios used in the lesson plan. Chart paper will be hung up so teacher can record student thoughts and copies of worksheets will be created for each student.

    Materials and Resources

    • “Ways I Use the Internet” handout
    • “Internet Safety Rules” handout
    • Red light/Green light handout
    • Letter template

    Introductory Activity (5-10 minutes)

    People use the Internet in multiple ways. Have students complete a short exercise where they circle all of the ways they use the Internet. Activities on the handout include:

    • Play games
    • Watch videos
    • Look at pictures
    • Look things up
    • Listen to music
    • Send e-mail
    • Write blogs/Social media
    • Do homework

    Give students a chance to share the different things they do online, including those they may have thought of that do not appear on the handout.

    Ask students: Has doing any of those things ever gotten you in trouble? Most will say no, but a few may say that they have watched a video, sent a mean e-mail, looked at bad pictures, played a game when they were supposed to be doing homework, etc.

    Main Lesson (20-30 minutes)

    Tell students that the Internet can be a lot of fun, but there are a lot of dangerous things online. Ask for volunteers to read the following scenarios:

    Scenario - 1 Clara was looking up information on a favorite singer when she saw a picture at the top of the screen flashing “Hot! Free! New!” She clicked on it and was taken to a very bad website. When she tried to click away another box popped up taking her to another bad website. Eventually, she just shut down the computer to get rid of them.

    Lesson Plan on Internet Safety

    Scenario - 2 Jack saw a similar picture on the website he was looking at. He clicked it and it said he could get a $50 gift card just for putting in his name, e-mail and phone number. He did it and he never got his gift card, but he did get a lot of annoying e-mails and some people calling the house asking for him.

    Ask students: What lesson(s) did Clara and Jack learn?

    Have students fill in the lesson learned (“don’t click on ads or flashing pictures”) on their Internet safety handout.

    After students have had a chance to give their say, ask them to write on their Internet safety handout:

    • Don’t talk to strangers.
    • Don’t click on strange links.
    • Don’t visit bad websites.

    Ask for a volunteer to read the following scenario:

    Scenario - 3A Zane was mad at Theo. Instead of telling him how mad he was to his face, he went online and sent off a mean e-mail to Theo. Since it was online, he thought no one would ever know. However, Theo read the e-mail and showed it to his mom. Then his mom called Zane’s mom and she grounded Zane. “Being mad is no reason to send mean e-mails like that,” his mom said.

    Ask students: What lesson did Zane learn?

    Share the following with students:

    Share or have student read part 2 of scenario.

     Female Teacher on Internet Safety

    Scenario - 3B However, the story does not end there. Theo was so mad at Zane, he put up a picture of Zane on a website and wrote the words “Zane likes to eat Brussels sprouts for breakfast and listen to little kids music!” At school, kids teased Zane for what they read, but Zane insisted it wasn’t true. Once Theo admitted he had made it up, the kids in their class learned another important lesson: Don’t believe everything you read on the Internet.

    Have students write that lesson on their Internet safety handout.

    Ask for a volunteer to read the following scenario:

    Worksheet on Internet Safety

    Scenario - 4 Maria got an e-mail from an address she didn’t recognize. It said: “Hey Maria, it’s Sarah. I got a new e-mail address. My mom was wondering what your address was so she could send you an invitation to my birthday party. Oh and can your ride your bike to the park after school tomorrow? Meet you there at 4 p.m.” Since she did not recognize the e-mail address, Maria decided she’d give Sarah her address at school tomorrow and talk to her about meeting at the park then.

    Ask students the following questions:

    • Why didn’t Maria respond to the e-mail? Did she make the right choice?
    • What Internet safety rules did Maria follow?

    After students have answered the questions, have them write the following on their Internet safety handout:

    • Don’t agree to meet anyone from the Internet
    • Don’t give out personal information online

    Ask students: What could’ve happened to Maria if she had responded to the e-mail?

    Explain to students that not being safe online can have negative consequences. In the audio clip, Florence faced some consequences for her actions. What were some of the consequences Florence faced? (Sample answers: she couldn’t get the pictures out of her mind, she kept going back to more sites)

    Create a chart of other things that can happen if you do not follow Internet rules. Examples include: limited Internet use, adults being disappointed, being hurt by strangers, seeing bad websites, giving your address or other info to bad people, accidentally spending money, feelings get hurt, etc.

    Students will fill in the “consequences” column on their Internet safety handout.

    Assessment (10-20 minutes)

    Students will take the Internet safety rules and consequences they have learned and turn them into a letter promising that they will stay safe online and report it to others. They will then sign their letters and keep them in their folders or display them on a bulletin board as a reminder.

    Texting - Internet Safety

    Internet Safety

    Grades 4-5-6

    Lesson Plan on Tattling

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    Easy Lesson Plan on Reporting Bullying Grades 123

    Lesson Plan on Reporting Bullying

    Introduction/Warm-Up (approximately 10 minutes):

    Ask the students to tell you what it feels like when someone says something mean to him or her, or how it feels when they get hurt when they play. Talk about how it feels when they are sad or hurt. Ask them what they do when they feel that way. Explain that nobody wants to feel hurt or sad.

    Lesson Explanation (30-40 minutes):

    Step 1 - Explain that even though it took place on the Internet, what happened to Robert was a form of bullying, and bullying of any kind is wrong. This kind of bullying is what we call cyberbullying.

    Explain to students what bullying means. Younger students may not fully understand what bullying is or the difference between verbal and physical abuse from bullying. Make sure that they understand that bullying is not something they do for fun or because everyone else does.

    Remind them of how it feels when they are hurt and explain that is how a person feels when they are bullied. Use the definition below to help illustrate the concept to the students.

    • Definition #1: Bullying – Repeated acts of abuse. When a person exerts verbal or physical force to exert power over another person or group.

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    Then give them the following examples of bullying:

    • Jack just started a new school. He is very smart and gets straight A’s. He does not like his new school; because one student is mean to him and forces him to do his schoolwork or he will hit Jack in the face every day.
    • Darla loves to play in her neighborhood. She plays on the playground every day. One day two other girls tells Darla that she cannot play on the playground anymore, unless she brings them candy every day. Darla ignores them and the next day at school the girls tell everyone that she sometimes wets the bed at night. Everyone laughs at Darla. Throughout that day the girls continue to tease and taunt Darla.

    Talk about how each is an example of bullying.

    Then ask the students what they should do in both of those examples.

    • Should Jack and Darla tell someone, or not? If so, who should they tell?

    Explain to the students that it is important to always report bullying whenever it happens to you or a friend.

    Tell them that many other children are scared to report bullying because of what may happen to them, but encourage them not to be worried about this and that if they tell the right person everything will be ok.

    Also, explain that you are going to tell them how to report bullying and they are going to practice it too.

    Reporting Bullying 123 Lesson Plan

    Step 2 - How to Report Bullying

    Explain to the students that when they or a friend is being bullied they should report a responsible adult, always. This can be a:

    • Teacher
    • Parent
    • Principal
    • School Administrator or Counselor
    • Care Taker
    • Coach
    • Adult Family Member

    When they tell the adult they should tell them the 5W’s of reporting bullying:

    • Who is bullying them?
    • What happened when they were bullied?
    • When did the bullying last happen?
    • Where were they bullied?
    • Why do they feel unsafe? (they were threatened, it happens all the time, etc.)
    • How were they bullied? (physical, verbal, emotionally, etc.)

    Explain that it is important to tell the adult that they feel unsafe and want them to help them.

    • Make sure that the students understand that bullying will not stop unless they report it. They should not try to stop it on their own; they need to get an adult person’s help.

    Then practice the 5W’s of reporting bullying with one of the scenarios that you went through earlier with the group.

    • To do this on the board write down; who, what, when, where, why and how and fill in the blanks accordingly from the scenario in step 1 to help students see how to report bullying.

    Reporting Bullying 123 Worksheet

    Step 3 - Let’s report bullying.

    • Then have your students complete the worksheets about how to report bullying.
    • In these worksheets students will read or go through a bullying scenario and then complete the prompt on how to report it using the 5W’s.

    Step 4 - Review and Recap.

    Once the students have completed the worksheets, as a group talk about why it is important to report bullying again. Make sure they understand that it will not stop unless they report it and that those that are bullying need to know that it is not allowed.

    • This only happens through reporting bullying.

    Reporting Bullying

    Grades 1-2-3

    Lesson Plan on Reporting Bullying

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    Easy lesson plan and worksheets on “Reporting Bullying” for grades 4th to 6th

    Reporting Bullying Booklet 456

    Introduction/Warm-Up (approximately 10 minutes):

    Read the passage to the students below and discuss what they would do.

    Passage: Diana just moved to a new town. She is attending a new school and does not like it. Everyday Rachel and Nicole tease Diana. See Diana wears very big glasses, has big curly hair and is very tall for her age. They call her names on the playground and at lunch. Diana used to pretend she didn’t hear them making fun of her. Lately, the girls have been teasing her more and more. At lunch the other day they got a bunch of other children to yell mean things at her. Diana walked off laughing but started crying when she reached the bathroom. She didn’t tell anyone because all she wanted to was fit in at her new school. Today at lunch they got another large group to yell at her and laugh at her, but it went too far some students started throwing stick and small rocks. One rock hit Diana’s glasses and they broke. When she got to class her teacher asked her what happened to her glasses. What should Diana do? The other kid that threw the rock didn’t mean to break her glasses. Should she tell her teacher about the bullying? Discuss

    Discuss this with your students. Explain to the students that Diana is being bullied and that is not right under any circumstances. Then ask them what they would do and why.

    Lesson Explanation (30-40 minutes):

    Step 1 - Tell the students that bullying is something that happens everywhere. Explain that there are many different types of bullying, and all bullying is not right.

    Tell the students that bullying is when someone continually verbally or physically tries to control or hurt them.

    • This can happen anywhere in person or on the computer.

    Explain to the students that it is important to always report bullying whenever it happens to them or a friend.

    Tell them that many other children are scared to report bullying because of what may happen to them.

    • Tell the students that it is important to tell an adult about this always and know that you will be safe.

    Explain that bullying will not stop unless they report it to an adult.

    It is important to report bullying to an adult because it is not safe to let it happen.

    Tell them that at school and home adults are there to help you stay safe. That is why it is important for them to know if you are being bullied.

    Encourage them not to be worried about this and that if they tell the right person everything will be ok.

    Also, explain that you are going to tell them how to report bullying and then they are going to practice.

    Reporting Bullying grades 456 lesson plan

    Step 2 - How to Report Bullying

    Explain to the students that when they or a friend is being bullied they should report a responsible adult, always. This can be a:

    • Teacher
    • Parent
    • Principal
    • School Administrator or Counselor
    • Care Taker
    • Coach
    • Adult Family Member

    When they tell the adult they should tell them the 5W’s of reporting bullying:

    • Who is bullying them?
    • What happened when they were bullied?
    • When did the bullying last happen?
    • Where were they bullied?
    • Why do they feel unsafe? (they were threatened, it happens all the time, etc.)
    • How were they bullied? (physical, verbal, emotionally, etc.)

    Explain that it is important to tell the adult that they feel unsafe and want them to help them.

    • Make sure that the students understand that bullying will not stop unless they report it. They should not try to stop it on their own; they need to get an adult person’s help.

    Then practice the 5W’s of reporting bullying with one of the scenarios that you went through earlier with the group.

    • To do this on the board write down; who, what, when, where, why and how and fill in the blanks accordingly from the scenario in step 1 to help students see how to report bullying.

    Step 3 - Reporting Role-play

    Break the students into two groups. Explain to the groups that you are going to read a scenario to them and it will be their job to act out how to report it to an adult.

    You will give the groups options on how to report it. One group will have an inappropriate way and the other group will have a correct way.

    As a class they must determine the correct way to report bullying.

    Then as a class review why it is important to report bullying.

    Reporting Bullying Grades 456 worksheet

    Scenarios:

    Bullying: Betty loves to play in her neighborhood. She plays on the playground every day. One day two other girls tell Betty that she cannot play on the playground anymore, unless she brings them candy every day. She ignores them and the next day at school the girls tell everyone that she sometimes wets the bed at night. Everyone laughs at Betty. Throughout that day the girls continue to tease and taunt Betty. Everyone in her class calls her Wetty Betty. Betty tells the girls to leave her alone. The girls do not. The next day at the playground they throw water balloons at her. At school they trip her and she falls in a puddle. Betty is scared to go outside. What should she do?

    • GROUP #2: Report to an adult: At school the next day Betty tells her teacher what has been happening. Act out how she should report it.

    Step 4 - Let’s report bullying.

    Then have your students complete the worksheets about how to report bullying.

    Step 5 - Review and Recap

    Once the students have completed the worksheets, as a group talk about why it is important to report bullying again. Make sure they understand that it will not stop unless they report it and that those that are bullying need to know that it is not allowed.

    • This only happens through reporting bullying.

    Reporting Bullying

    Grades 1-2-3

    Lesson Plan on Reporting Bullying

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    Easy Character Education Lesson Plan on Cyberbullying for Grades 4th to 6th.

    Cyberbullying educational booklet

     

    Objectives

    1. To define cyberbullying.
    2. To explain the ways cyberbullies harass others.
    3. To contrast the differences between in-person bullying and cyberbullying.
    4. To list and discuss ways to report cyberbullying.

    Resources and Materials Needed

    • Venn Diagram and Understanding Worksheet
    • Reading Passage

    Introduction

    • Students will be able to identify places that cyberbullying occurs.
    • Students will be able to recognize what cyberbullying and how it differs from in-person bullying.
    • Students will be able to name ways to report cyberbullying.

    Prior Knowledge (5 minutes)

    Allow students to share what they know about bullying.

    Introduction/Warm-Up: (5 minutes)

    • Read the following passage to the students:

      Robert is in fifth grade. He gets teased sometimes at school. He uses websites to stay in touch with his cousins who live far away. He has a private profile and only accepts friend requests from people he knows. A girl from school named Jenny wanted to add Robert as a friend on this site. Robert thought Jenny was a nice girl, and he accepted her request. Jenny started sending very mean messages to Robert through the website. She teased him and posted information that was embarrassing and not true on his profile page.

    • Ask your students:
      • Do you think Robert was being bullied?
      • What do you think Robert should do?
      • Take a few minutes and write down what you think.
    • Allow students to share their answers if they are comfortable.

    Cyberbullying 456 Lesson Plan

    Lesson Presentation: (35-45 minutes

    Part A — Explanations

    1 - Explain that even though it took place on the Internet, what happened to Robert was a form of bullying, and bullying of any kind is wrong. This kind of bullying is what we call cyberbullying.

    2 - Give students the definition of cyberbullying.

    • Cyberbullying is any kind of bullying that takes place electronically.

    3 - Ask them to brainstorm places where people communicate or share information electronically and make a list of these on the board.

    • Online websites
    • Social media sites.
    • Text messages/cell phones
    • Email
    • Chatting
    • Text messages/cell phones

    4 - Remind the class how Robert was cyberbullied by Jenny in the story from the warm-up. How did Jenny bully Robert online?

    • By sending mean emails and posting embarrassing information that wasn’t true about Robert.

    5 - Tell the class that cyberbullies will bother and harass others the same way regular bullies do. Then ask the class: What are some ways people might try to bully others online or with electronic devices? What are some examples you can think of?

    • Sending mean text messages
    • Spreading rumors online
    • Putting up a photograph of someone to embarrass them

    6 - Tell the class there are some other ways that cyberbullying and in-person bullying are different.

    • Cyberbullying can happen anytime since we have Internet and cell phones available to us all day long, every day.
    • Cyberbullying can happen anonymously since you never see who actually is behind the keyboard doing the typing.

    Lesson plan on cyberbullying tips

    • (Other possible answers you can give if they don’t come up with them: posting negative and embarrassing videos of someone, putting up pictures or videos that are embarrassing in general, making a fake profile under the victim’s identity, texting the victim numerous times to make a cell phone bill go up.)

    Cyberbullying 456 Worksheet

    Part B — How to Report Cyberbullying

    1 - Tell the class that while you should still inform a parent and a teacher that you have been cyberbullied, there are some special differences to keep in mind when you need to report cyberbullying:

    • Do not respond to a message that contains cyberbullying
    • Do not forward that message on to others
    • Print out the evidence if you can
    • Do not delete the evidence
    • Block the bully from your phone, profile, or email address
    • Report the bully’s phone number, screen name, or email address to the phone company or web site

    2 - Inform students that if there are threats of violence or hate crimes, inappropriate videos or pictures, or stalking taking place that they should report the incident to the police.

    Part C — How to Protect Yourself Against Cyberbullying

    1 - Give students examples of ways to try to avoid a cyberbully and allow them to offer their own ideas and suggestions.

    • Maintain a private profile if you use social media
    • Only accept invitations and friend requests from people who are your true friends or family members
    • Be cautious about sharing your phone number and email address

    Part D — Journalism/News Reporting Game

    A - Divide students into pairs. Each group will be assigned a place where cyberbullying could take place: email, text message, social media site, chat room. You will need to have several groups cover the same territory depending on class size.

    B - One person in the pair needs to be the live news reporter and the other is the news anchor in the newsroom.

    C - The students will create a hypothetical cyberbullying situation and need to be able to complete a news report. They can use the following questions or build upon them:

      • What is cyberbullying?
      • Who is being cyberbullied?
      • Who did the bullying?
      • What happened?
      • When did this take place?
      • Where did it happen?
      • How did this happen/How did the bully get the victim’s information?
      • How did the victim report the incident?
      • What will happen to the bully now?
      • How could the victim protect himself/herself from cyberbullying

    Students will script out their skit and present them to the class.

    Exercise (worksheet# 3)

    Directions:—Students will fill in the Venn Diagram on worksheet 3. List all of the DIFFERENCES between bullying and cyberbullying in the corresponding circles. List the SIMILARITIES in the overlapping circle.

    Review

    Collect worksheets and review the differences and similarities between cyberbullying and regular bullying. Go over the ways to try to prevent cyberbullying and ways to report cyberbullying.

    Cyber Bullying Group exercise

    Useful resource: https://www.wizcase.com/blog/a-comprehensive-cyberbullying-guide-for-parents/

    Teach about Cyberbullying right now!

    Grades 4-5-6

    Lesson Plan on Tattling

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